Jasper County Biographies

Jesse Elijah Dunn/Mollie E Pruett

DUNN - Jesse Elijah DUNN (Dec 8-1873/Mar 4-1955) married July 1, 1899 to Mollie Elizabeth PRUETT (Aug 29-1878/Apr 27-1946). They were the parents of three children. Mary Pearl DUNN (Mar 24-1900) married May 19 1934 to Glen W. CLINE; Everett Willard Nathan DUNN (Aug 19-1902) married Marcella HAYGOOD; Lloyd Delos DUNN (Sep 8, 1904/Jan 18, 1966) married May 25 1927 to Wilda Irene DEWEES.



Nathan Dunn/Betsey Louise Norton

DUNN - Nathan (Jan 19 1934 VT/ Feb 26 1904 Rensselaer) married Dec 21 1863 Joliet IL to Betsey Louise NORTON (Apr 16 1838 VT/Apr 3 1927 Rensselaer). They had 5 children: Norah E (Mar 30 1867 Joliet) married John Newton BICKNELL; William Allen DUNN (Apr 15 1868 Joliet) married Minnie Louisa BEHIRNS; Nellie S DUNN (Aug 15 1872); Jesse Elijah DUNN (Dec 8 1873) married Mollie Elizabeth PRUETT; Margaret Mae DUNN (1877/May 21 1895) married Ulysses Grant HEISTAND.



Clay DeWees/Effie Martin

DeWEES - Henry Clay DeWees (Dec 29 1880/Jun 21 1956) married Effie V MARTIN (May 14 1887/Sep 17 1918). Their children were Wilda Irene DeWEES (Nov 25 1908); Gaylord Thomas DeWEES (Jul 15 1910); Elizabeth Leona DeWEES (Dec 10 1911); Rebecca Gaskell DeWEES (Sep 21 1913). Clay married second Bessie Irene McELFRESH (Oct 17 1894/Sep 22 1981). Their children: Donald Clay (May 11 1922; Marvin Wayne DeWEES (May 19 1928).



Harvey W Wood/Mary Caroline Crockett

WOOD - Harvey W. Wood (Apr 17 1838/Aug 23 1924) married May 11 1871 to Mary Caroline CROCKETT (Sep 22 1850/Mar 12 1932). Their children were John Paul Wood (1874-1948) married Henrietta FAY (1895-1966); Mabel Q WOOD (Mar 24 1876/Feb 10 1951) married Feb 17 1907 to John Wm RISHLING; Vansoy Milton WOOD (Apr 29 1880/May 25 1962) married Anna PHILLIPS; Harvey W WOOD Jr married Oct 30 1904 to Jennie M MURRAY; Mary Salome WOOD (Apr 28 1884/May 10 1969) married Harley Ernest Bruce; Chauncey H WOOD (b Sep 23 1887) married Laverne GUYER; Letha May WOOD (Dec 21 1890/Jun 27 1975) married Mar 25 1913 to William Elmer JACKS



Stephen A Brusnahan/Ida Martha Pettet

BRUSNAHAN - Stephen A BRUSNAHAN (Nov 8 1864/May 26 1937) married Apr 1 1886 to Ida Martha PETTET (Dec 7 1862/Aug 10 1935). Their children: Raphael (Ray) Andrew BRUSNAHAN (Nov 6 1887/Oct 16 1961) married Nov 25 1913 Mary Loretta RUSSELL; Clara Cornelia BRUSNAHAN (Jul 9 1888/Apr 14 1915) married Omer WAYMIRE; Charles Gerald BRUSNAHAN (Nov 4 1890/Oct 2 1972) married Vesta BROWN; James Victor BRUSNAHAN (Jun 7 1893/Dec 11 1974) married Ocie Olive WOOD; Stansilaus Stephen BRUSHANAN (Dec 22 1895/Feb 25 1972) married Ellen KRESLER; Lucy Marie BRUSNAHAN (Feb 24 1898/Aug 8 1991) married Louis Joseph LANE; Edwin Paul BRUSNAHAN (Oct 9 1900/Aug 18 1983) married Mary Cecelia CALLAHAN; John Kenneth BRUSNAHAN (Dec 14 1904/Feb 22 1905)



Christian Cline/Catherine Swisher

CLINE - Christian CLINE (b 1787 NC) married Mar 15 1813 to Catherine SWISHER (b 1793). Their children 10: Jacob CLINE MD; William Wesley CLINE married Mar 2 1856 to Margaret DeGROOT in Preble Co. OH. Their son, Schyler CLINE married Lillie HARRIS. They had two children: Lora CLINE (b 1896) married Henry Clark, then later married Vern Perdieu. Glen (May 30 1898/Sep 18 1960) married Mary Pearl DUNN (Mar 24 1900). They had two children: Phyllis Joan CLINE married Ronald Lee Ewing. William Willard CLINE married to Betty Jo Wallace. They had four children: Kimberly Jo CLINE; Mary Michelle CLINE; Melissa Ann CLINE; and William Bryan CLINE (Jan 31 1971- Oct 18 1986).



Travis D Corbin

CORBIN - Travis Doleman CORBIN (1806 VA) son of Reuben & Elizabeth RIDDLE CORBIN. Travis' children: William Franklin, Andrew Jackson, Mary Catherine, Sarah Jane, George Washington, John Wesley and Hiram Emanuel. John Wesley CORBIN married 1873 to Leah Elizabeth MARTIN. Their son: Chester CORBIN. His son, Chester Jr. married Roberta PETTET. Their children: Jeanette Ellen, Charles Ray, Roger Lee & Karen Kay.



James Berton Odle/Hattie E Spitler

ODLE/SPITLER - James Berton ODLE (7 May 1876 Kentland IN) married Hattie Emily SPITLER, daughter of Noah SPITLER & Elizabeth HONN 3 Jan 1899 Kansas. He died Oct 11 1959 Clements KS. Hattie was born Oct 6 1879 Newton Co. IN. Their children: 1. Albert Cecil ODLE (27 Oct 1899 Chase Co. KS) married Daisy DEERING; 2. Bertha ODLE (30 Sep 1901 KS) married Roy ANDRES 18 Feb 1925 Chase Co KS. He died Jun 1991 Topeka KS; 3. Maude ODLE (6 Sep 1903 KS) married Harry BERENDS 14 Nov 1923 KS, she died 20 Jan 1990 Topeka KS; 4. Myrtle ODLE (25 Mar 1906 KS) married Walter BERENDS 3 Sep 1934 KS; 5. Vernon ODLE (23 May 1913 KS) married Dorothy MERRITT 5 Nov 1933 Chase Co KS, died 21 Apr 1992 KS.



John (Kohlhavy) Lane/Rosalie Koran

KORAN - LANE (KOHLHAVY) - John Kohlhavy and his sister, Barbara, came to the United States from Bohemia, a province of Austria, which is now Czechoslovakia. It is not known how many others of the family there were, or if they immigrated to the States. Barbara Kohlhavy married John BERENDA and they immigrated, with their two sons, in 1892. John KOHLHAVY was born in October 1826 and died Aug 21 1913. The Bohemian meaning of the name "Kohlhavy" is "Lame", however, after coming to the US from Czechoslovakia, the family name was changed to the English word "Lane". John (Kohlhavy) LANE was married to Rosalie KORAN, who was born in 1826 and died in childbirth Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, 1869. She was buried first, in the vicinity of the present Grotto on the St Joseph's College grounds, and later re-interred in Mt Calvary Cemetery. She was buried holding her infant daughter, who died at birth. They had two sons, Joseph Anthony & James LANE. From family traditions history.



Abraham Pruett/Rebecca Branson

PRUETT/PRUITT/PREWETT - Abraham (son of Richard Pruett) was born ca 1773/74 probably in Pittsylvania Co. VA. Died probably in Roane Co. TN. Married Feb. 1, 1793 in Pittsylvania Co VA to Rebecca Branson (a cousin). She was born ca 1770 in Pittsylvania Co VA. She came to Parke Co. IN where she died in Jackson Twp. Her parents: Absalom & Jemima (Lorton) Branson. They had 7 children: 1. Infant; 2. Jonathon b Dec 29 1793 NC; 3. Samuel b 1797 VA; 4. Stephen b 1799 NC; 5. Michael b Nov 17 1803 Grainger Co TN; 6. Jemima Lorton I b Dec 18 1806 Grainger Co TN; 7. John b 1815 Grainger Co TN. Information from a genealogy by Richard A. Prewitt .

Jonathan Pruett was born Dec 28 1683 in North Carolina and married Elizabeth Branson on Feb. 4, 1819. Elizabeth was born Jan 29 1798 in North Carolina to Hezekiah Branson and Agnes Pready. They had 11 children:
1. Martha Ann Pruett b Apr. 11, 1821 Knox Co KY. Married Apr. 28, 1842 to William Randolph DeWeese in Parke Co. They had 7 children.
2. Barthena Pruett b Nov. 3 1823 Knox Co. KY
3. Mahala Pruett b Sep. 21, 1825 Knox Co. KY
4. Sarah "Sally" Pruett b 1827 Knox Co. KY m Jonathan Nathan Branson Parke Co on July 7, 1844 (Bk B p55). Two children.
5. James Pruett b Mar. 15, 1828 Knox Co. KY. m Nancy Thompson in Parke Co IN on Mar. 6, 1853 (Bk 2 p 89)
6. Marshall Noah Pruett b Sep. 19, 1829 Knox Co. KY m Sarah Jane Thompson Parke Co Mar. 9, 1851 (Bk 1 p 265). She was born Sep. 5, 1833 IN to Squire Thompson and Unis Adams. They had three children.
7. Abraham Pruett b 1831 Parke Co. IN m Sarah Ann Cooper in Parke Co on July 14, 1852 (Bk 2 p 30) She was born in NC in 1832.
8. Jonathan Pruett Jr. b June 6, 1833 Parke Co. IN m Martha E. Steele in Putnam Co on Sep. 1, 1858 (Bk 2 p 389) She was born 1835 in IN. One son: Robert O Pruett b 1859.
9. Susan Pruett b Oct. 18, 1835 Parke Co. IN m Jonathan Branson as his second wife Oct. 18, 1835 (Bk 2 p 354) Jonathan was born Tazewell TN Feb. 23, 1802 to Hezekiah Branson and Agnes Pready. Jonathan d Pottawattamie Co. IA May 8, 1881.
10. Eliza Jane Pruett b Oct. 27, 1837 Parke Co. IN. m Benjamin M. Michael (1842-1927) in Parke Co on Sep. 6, 1863 (Bk 3 p 493)
11. Jemima Pruett b July 1, 1843 Parke Co. IN



JOHN MAKEEVER. True worth always commands respect and usually meets with a fuller reward in material prosperity. A Conspicuous example of this truth may be found in the career of the late John Makeever, who was born in Green County, Pennsylvania, December 1, 1819, and died in Rensselaer, Jasper County, Indiana, January 3, 1910. He was a son of Patrick and Isabel (Sweeney) Makeever, and came of good stock on both sides of the family. The father, Patrick Makeever, was a native of County Donegal, Ireland, and the younger son of an Irish nobleman. As a younger son, he had scant expectations of succeeding to an ancestral estate, and, accordingly, with the desire of bettering his prospects and making a home and name for himself, he came when a young man to America, crossing the ocean in a sailing vessel. He located first in Pennsylvania, where he married, subsequently, with his wife and family, removing to Morrow County, Ohio. From there he later moved to Jasper County, Indiana, to live with his children, and died here in 1856 at the remarkable age of one hundred and four years.

John Makeever was one of ten children. He accompanied his parents to Morrow County, Ohio, when ten years old and was there reared to man's estate, his boyhood days being passed on the farm, after the manner of the boys of that pioneer period. Later he returned to Pennsylvania and in 1842 was there married to Mary Ann Sharp. Taking up his residence again in Morrow County, Ohio, he engaged in agriculture, and was thus occupied in that locality until 1845, in which year he came with his family to Jasper County, locating on government land which he entered three and one-half miles west of Rensselaer, in Newton Township. He cut the logs and built his cabin and there lived until 1856, afterwards erected a frame house, which was his residence until 1881. Prior to the latter date had built the Makeever Hotel in Rensselaer, and in this he lived for the remainder of his life. A man of enterprise and far-sighted, he became an extensive holder of Jasper County realty and was also largely engaged in the stock business. Together with his other activities, he also conducted a private bank, or, more properly, a private office, where he transacted banking in a small way. In 1883 he and his son-in-law, Jay W. Williams, established the Farmers Bank in Rensselaer, and this they conducted until 1899, when the banking business was discontinued owing to the failing health of Mr. Williams. Mr. Makeever was a charter member of the Masonic fraternity at Rensselaer and in politics was a Jacksonian democrat. He began life's battle on his own responsibility, with no material aid from friends or relations, and became wealthy through his own exertions by reason of indomitable energy and his splendid business foresight. From his seventeenth year he was one of the active leaders of the Methodist Episcopal Church, which he served as trustee, class leader and Sunday School superintendent. He and his wife had three children: Almira, who resides in Rensselaer, the widow of William Sims Stockton, and the mother of three children: Clay and May, who died in infancy, and Jay W., who lives on the old Makeever homestead in Newton Township, Jasper County; Cordelia, the widow of Jay W. Williams, appropriate mention of whom is made in this work, her daughter, Mary Jane, being the wife of Charles H. Porter of Rensselaer; and John Napoleon, who died in infancy.

Mr. Makeever's second marriage was with Mrs. Lewis Macy and was celebrated February 8, 1886. There were no children of this union. Mrs. Makeever first married Lewis Macy and was the mother of two sons: George Julian Macy, a resident of Columbus and an expert accountant, who married Miss Abbie Patterson; and John Sherman Macy, a resident of Indianapolis, Indiana, and engaged in the wholesale millinery business, who married Miss Elma Sowerwine, and they have a daughter names Margaret. Mrs. John Makeever is a resident of Rensselaer, a noble woman of Christian charity, and honored and revered by all who know her. She is a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Rensselaer.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties, Indiana -
The Lewis Publishing Company Chicago and New York - 1916

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WILLIAM SIMS STOCKTON. Men of business acumen and business foresight are the levers of all commercialism, and the subject of this sketch, William Sims Stockton, was one of the men of Indiana who did not fall short in the scale of business ability.

Mr. Stockton was a native of Tippecanoe County, Indiana, born April 19, 1833, and died January 9, 1911. He received a good practical education, being first a student in the local schools and then at Wabash College. He was an agriculturist and stockman and then engaged in mercantile life and finally in the real estate business in West Lafayette, Indiana. Politically he was a democrat and fraternally he was a Mason, being a member of the chapter at Lafayette. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Mr. Stockton was a gentleman of pleasing personality and address and of strict business principles. He died in the City of Chicago.

His first marriage was to Miss Nancy Whitsel and was celebrated in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, October 13, 1839. She died July 26, 1866, and her remains are interred in the Hebron Cemetery in Tippecanoe County. Five children were born to this union, four sons and one daughter, only two of them now living: Edward, a resident of Chicago and engaged in commercial life, received a good education and was a student at Purdue University; Frank, a resident of the State of Washington at Greenacre, where he has a fine fruit ranch, is married and has one daughter.

Mr. Stockton married for his second wife Miss Almira Makeever on October 15, 1867. Three children, two sons and one daughter, were born, and the only one now living is the son, Jay William Makeever Stockton, a resident of Newton Township, Jasper County, an agriculturist, and living on the old Makeever homestead. He was educated in the common schools and took a business course in a commercial college in Lafayette. He married Miss Stella Perkins and they have four living children: John Judson, in the seventh grade and taking a short course at Purdue University; Stella Almira, also in the seventh grade; Julia Cordelia, in the fifth grade; and Jay Perkins, deceased; and William Sims, the youngest. Jay Makeever Stockton is a democrat politically. Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Rensselaer, and his children are also identified with that church. He formerly served a steward on the official board.

Mrs. Stockton is a native of Morrow County, Ohio, born September 13, 1843, and is a daughter of the well known citizen John Makeever whose full review is given in this publication. Sh was only a child when she became a resident of Jasper County, and was educated in the schools of this county and is a graduate of the Methodist College at Valparaiso, Indiana, with the class of 1864. She taught school in Marion, Ohio. She is a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Rensselaer and has been president, treasurer and secretary of the Ladies Foreign Missionary Society of the church and was delegate to the branch meeting of this organization, including representatives from four states, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin. Mrs. Stockton is a lady of pleasing personality and address and comes from ones of the old and stanch pioneer families of the county.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
The Lewis Publishing Company - Chicago and New York - 1916

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JUDGE CHARLES WALKER HANLEY. As judge of the Thirtieth Judicial Circuit, comprising the counties of Jasper and Newton, Judge Hanley has for the past thirteen years given the people of this circuit the benefit of disinterested service, of long and thorough experience in public life, and a broad knowledge of men and affairs. He is a native son of Jasper County and is an able lawyer. Possessed of scrupulous honesty and a fine sense of justice, his friends and practically all the people of his district unite in declaring him one of the most competent men who has ever sat on the Circuit Court bench in this district.

Judge Hanley's family has been one of more than ordinary usefulness and distinction to Jasper County since the decade of the '50s. His father, William Hanley, was born at Fort Wayne, Indiana, August 6, 1838, of Irish parentage. Grandfather Thomas Hanley was born in Limerick, Ireland, and there married Mary Hare. Thomas Hanley was a schoolmaster in the old country and also after coming to America. He and his wife came to this country by sailing vessel about the year 1826. William Hanley, who was the youngest of thirteen children, grew up in Fort Wayne, but was left motherless at the age of six years, and from that time until early manhood was reared under the care of an older sister. He received his primary education in the public and parochial schools, and this was supplemented by a course at some Catholic institution of higher learning.

It was in the early '50s that William Hanley came to Jasper County, Indiana, and was first known to the people as a farm hand, one who commended himself by his industry and faithfulness. After the discovery of gold in Colorado he joined an emigrant train and went out to that territory, where he lived for some time and his name finds a place in early territorial annals. He was one of the first territorial delegates at the first territorial convention, representing the Boulder Camp. In that convention the delegates adopted the criminal laws of the State of Kansas and the civil laws of the State of Nebraska, by resolution, as the laws of Colorado Territory. After several years of this life in the far west William Hanley returned east and stopped in Iowa long enough to marry Elizabeth Peregrine, who was born December 1, 1844, in Scott County, Indiana, and was the daughter of a Christian minister. From Iowa he brought his bride to Indiana, and during a brief residence at Lafayette was employed as clerk in a grocery store. He then came to Gillam Township in Jasper County, and identified with farming. Not long after the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted in the Union army as a private in the 38th Indiana Volunteer Infantry. With the expiration of his term of enlistment he returned to Jasper County, resumed farming in Gillam Township until 1888, and then moved to Kniman in Walker Township, which continued to be his home until his death on February 23, 1908. His wife survived until July 21, 1913, her death occurring at Chicago. Of their five children, four are now living. The late William Hanley was of Catholic parentage but severed his allegiance with the parent church and became identified with the Methodist Episcopal Denomination. Some of the qualities of his character deserve mention as part of his individual record and for the benefit of his descendants. He was a man much above the average in point of intellect and general information, and a great reader. He kept abreast of the times, and was not only well informed as to the current topics of the day but was somewhat of a philosophic student of events as well. Along with the powers of keen observation he had the faculty of being able to describe in language what he saw and his discourse was of rare interest. He had the happy faculty of always being in good humor, and was generous to a fault, perhaps for this reason never having been accounted among the wealthy men of Jasper County. He was well grounded in music and a great lover of harmony, and one of his great pleasures was in either playing or singing music. He enjoyed the highest esteem of his neighbors and commanded the respect of all who knew him. Two of his children are now living in Jasper County: Ella, the wife of Lester A. Sayers at Wheatfield; and Charles W., of Rensselaer.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
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CHARLES W. HANLEY. Charles W. Hanley, whose career as a lawyer and judge has added to the worthy distinctions associated with the family name, was born in Jasper County July 5, 1865. His primary Education came from the public schools of this county, and for one year he was a student in the State Normal School at Terre Haute. The first important vocation of his life was teaching school in Jasper County for four years. With the exception of two years spent in the West, his home has always been in Jasper County. Quite early in life he became interested in local politics, and in 1892 was the successful nominee of the republican party for the office of county sheriff. He served two terms in that position and his service of four years gave a strong hold upon popular confidence. In the meantime, he had taken up the study of law prior to his election as sheriff, and continued his studies as opportunity offered and soon after the expiration of his second term of office he was admitted to the bar and began practice at Rensselaer in partnership with Judson J. Hunt. This was a partnership of mutual profit and advantage for six years. It was dissolved when Mr. Hanley was elected judge of the Thirtieth Judicial Circuit, comprising the counties of Jasper and Newton, in 1902. In 1908 his re-election came with opposition, his name being the choice of all political parties. In 1914 he was re-elected for the third term. Beyond the practically unanimous verdict which has kept Judge Hanley in office for so many consecutive years there is no need for any detailed expressions of his qualifications and efficiency for the judicial office.

Judge Hanley is affiliated with the Masonic Order Lodge No. 125; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows Lodge No. 143; and the Knights of Pythias Castle Hall No. 82. His first wife was Josephine Farris, daughter of George W. Farris of Gillam Township. After the death of Mrs. Hanley, he was married in September, 1893, to Hattie L. Hopkins, of Rensselaer. Judge Hanley has two sons: Cope J. and Emil W. Cope J. is a junior in the law course of the University of Colorado at Boulder City, Colo. He is a graduate of the Rensselaer High School. Emil W. is a freshman in Miami College at Oxford, Ohio, and he is also a graduate of the Rensselaer High School.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
The Lewis Publishing Company - Chicago and New York - 1916

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STEWART C. HAMMOND. One of the few remaining pioneers of Jasper County is Stewart C. Hammond of Rensselaer. His has been a life of quiet effectiveness, marked by a record of many duties well done and many responsibilities faithfully fulfilled. He is one of the men who developed and made Jasper County what it is. While never in the conspicuous activities of abnormal events, in the round of commonplace accomplishment and in the faithful and intelligent performance of every task allotted to him during his long life, he has a record that may well be envied and admired by the present and future generations.

Stewart C. Hammond was born October 24, 1827. When a child, his parents moved to Vermillion County, Indiana, and thence to Vermillion County, Illinois. They had hardly located in the latter county when an epidemic of milk sickness caused them to reload their ox wagons and return to Indiana. They remained at Monticello in White County for a time, and in 1837 moved to Jasper County, where they entered a tract of land from the Government located about five miles southeast of the present site of the City of Rensselaer in Marion Township. Theirs was one of the early log cabin homes to be erected and to stand as a mark of advancing civilization in this section. Following this came the heavy work of clearing and improving, and thenceforward to the present for a period of more than eight decades the name Hammond has been one of significance in Jasper County. When the family first located there the Indians had been only "officially" removed, and were in fact as numerous as the whites. If the country was not one that flowed with milk and honey, it did furnish many opportunities for the simple livelihood of the pioneer, who could secure wild game in abundance and by his own ingenuity he fashioned nearly all the simple furniture and conveniences necessary for living.

On the old homestead in Marion Township Stewart C. Hammond grew to manhood. His education came less from books than from practical contact with the woods and prairies and he became an expert in all the arts required for existence in the early days. On December 13, 1856, he married Rebecca Pillars. About that time they moved to a place about three miles southwest of Rensselaer, and he subsequently bought the land and developed it as a homestead farm, which he occupied until 1891. Mr. Hammond then removed to Rensselaer and has since lived quietly retired. His wife died November 1, 1899. Their seven children are mentioned briefly as follows: William; Emma, Mrs. Marion I. Adams; Joseph P.; Rose, Mrs. Clarence V. Harold; May, now deceased, who was the wife of Daniel Waymire; Charles G.; and Bertha, Mrs. Clinton Brown.

Stewart C. Hammond has thus lived nearly all his life in Jasper County. His occupation has been that of a farmer. No unusual events have occurred in his career, but he bore his part in the period that brought Jasper County from its primitive condition to one of high civilization. He has been a witness and factor in the many events which are recorded in the progress of this community since its first settlement. When he was in young manhood the cradle was considered a great improvement over the old primitive sickle, and then later in his experience came the reaper, and that was finally replaced by the modern harvesting machine. He was doing the work of a man before the first railroad came to this part of Indiana, and the dirt highways furnished the only means of transportation with wagons drawn by oxen or horses. The swamps under his vision have been reclaimed and converted into productive farms and happy homes. His life in its personal features has been a clean one, and the niche allotted unto him has been creditable filled. The satisfaction of having lived a well spent life, of having lived to the best of his ability, and of having practiced the precepts of the Golden Rule, of having confidence and esteem of his fellow men, are his in a retrospective view at life's evening. He is a member of the Free Will Baptist Church. While a strong republican in politics, he has never sought nor wanted public office.

Of his children special mention is given in this article to Joseph P. Hammond, who has for many years been a factor in Jasper County life and is now giving conscientious and efficient service as county auditor.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
The Lewis Publishing Company - Chicago and New York - 1916

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JOSEPH P. HAMMOND. Joseph P. Hammond was born on the old homestead in Jasper County June 2, 1863. His primary education came from the public schools, and he also had the advantage of a course of training the Eastman Business College at Poughkeepsie, New York. Many people who recall his earlier activities know him best as a teacher. For twelve years he was engaged in educational work in Jasper County, and of that period three years were spent at Fair Oaks and three years at DeMotte. In 1897 Mr. Hammond was elected county truant officer, and in connection with the duties of that position handled an insurance business at Rensselaer. In 1900 he moved to Wheatfield to become cashier of the Bank of Wheatfield, in which office he continued until 1908. He then went to Remington as vice president of the First National Bank and remained until the affairs of the institution were liquidated. Returning to Rensselaer, Mr. Hammond was assistant cashier of the First National Bank of the county seat until January 1, 1912. At that date he assumed the duties of county auditor, to which office he had been elected in the fall of 1910. He was re-elected auditor in 1914, and is now in the fourth year of his service in that important public position.

Mr. Hammond is a republican, a member of the Masonic Order, Prairie Lodge, No. 125, and the Knights of Pythias, Castle Hall, No. 82. He was a charter member of the Wheatfield Lodge. He belongs to the Methodist Church. On June 20, 1892, he married Miss Elizabeth Stackhouse. She died in 1900, and of her three children, one died in infancy and the other two are Herbert C. and Bernice, both graduates of the Rensselaer High School. Herbert is associated with his father in the office and will be deputy auditor. Bernice wedded Leo L. Calvert, a resident of Joliet, Illinois, and one of the Public Service Company. On January 28, 1902, Mr. Hammond married Marie Jensen. By this union there is one son, Maurice.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
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JAMES N. LEATHERMAN. A resident of Jasper County for more than a quarter of a century, Mr. Leatherman has been engaged in some form of useful service all this time, and was for eight years, county auditor. He is now one of the county's most popular bankers, and his broad experience as a county official and his large acquaintance with the people of Jasper County have done much to increase his efficiency and value as cashier of the First National Bank of Rensselaer.

James N. Leatherman is a native of White County, Indiana, where he was born December 1, 1862. His birthplace was Princeton Township of that county. James and Elizabeth (Hollenback) Leatherman, his parents, were natives of West Virginia and came to White County in the fall of 1850, being among the early settlers. About 1893 they removed to Rensselaer, where the father died in March, 1912, and the mother in 1898. Seven of their eleven children are still living.

James N. Leatherman was reared and educated in White County, and a number of his youthful years were spent as a teacher. That calling he pursued principally in the winter months, and spent the summer seasons in farming. On November 18, 1888, he married Miss Julietta Randle. In September, 1889, about a year after his marriage, he removed to Jasper County, and in this county continued his work as an educator and was also employed in the county surveyor's office. From 1893 to 1904 he was in the grain office now managed by the firm of Babcock & Hopkins.

Mr. Leatherman has always been a citizen of public spirit and has taken much interest in local affairs, and in 1902 was elected county auditor of Jasper County, assuming the duties of that office in 1904. By re-election he served eight years all told. Following his retirement from the office he spent one year as assistant cashier and in 1913 was elected cashier of the First National Bank of Rensselaer.

Mr. Leatherman is a republican and is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, Castle Hall, No. 82, at Rensselaer and he and his wife are both church members. Their two children are: Bethel, deceased; and Helen.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
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ALEXANDER J. KENT. Few towns in Indiana have their names more worthily bestowed as a permanent tribute to their founders than Kentland. It is a part of the history of Newton County as well as an appropriate tribute to the career of the founder of Kentland that some concise account should be contained in this publication of his life.

He was born August 30, 1815, in Oneida County, New York, and died at his home in the suburbs of Kentland May 7, 1882. Between those dates he accomplished a great deal more than the man of average abilities can expect to achieve. He belonged to an old New England family. His parent, Carroll C. and Phoebe (Dimock) Kent, both natives of Connecticut, were born in the same year, same month and same day, October 17, 1777, while the war for independence was being waged against the mother country by the American colonies. Phoebe Dimock was a daughter of Colonel Dimock who attained that rank in the English army. One of the battles of the Revolution made familiar to every American schoolboy was that fought at Oriskany, New York, in which the American leader, the gallant General Herkimer, defeated the nine tribes of Indians. The scene of the battle was land owned by Carroll C. Kent, and afterwards owned by Alexander J. Kent. Carroll C. Kent died at Whitesboro, New York, at the age of eighty-three, while his wife passed away August 21 1827, aged fifty.

While Alexander J. Kent came of a very substantial family according to the standards of wealth in that time, he built his fortune largely through his individual talents and wisely directed labors. He had only a common school education, such as nearly all the boys of his generation received. He lived in New York State for a number of years and was first drawn to the West after the discovery of gold in California. In 1849 he equipped a party of five men and furnished them with transportation to Sacramento, California. Not long afterwards he went out himself to the Pacific Coast, and in 1851 became head of the firm of Kent, Fowler & Company at Sacramento. They had a flourishing wholesale grocery business in the California capital, and in spite of the destruction of their plant by fire, they quickly re-established themselves and carried on business even more extensively than before. The partners after selling their mercantile enterprise bought a vessel and went into the importing business between San Francisco and China. It is worthy to be recalled that their vessel, the Anna Welsh, on its first trip brought to America the first colony of Chinese. After three very profitable voyages the partners sold the vessel, and Mr. Kent then returned to New York.

In the meantime, his brother, the late P. M. Kent, had become extensively interested in Indiana and soon induced Alexander to invest in some of the wild land then hardly settled at all in Northwestern Indiana. During 1853-54 Alexander J. Kent traveled all over the undeveloped sections of Northwestern Indiana, and began the investment which eventually gave him control of more than 25,000 acres. In 1855 he engaged in the wholesale grocery trade at New Albany, Indiana, with his brother, Bela C. Kent, and in those early days conducted one of the largest establishments of its kind in the state. It was in 1859 that he moved his family from New Albany to what is now Newton County. He owned large tracts of the best land in this county, and did much to encourage settlement and development. Many Pioneers came to the county about that time, bought farms around Kentland and proceeded to undertake the heavy task of development. There were not wanting many cases in which honest industry met with discouragement and misfortune. It is said that but for the liberality of Mr. Kent many farmers who later became prosperous would have given up their farms and left the county. He was always patient and considerate in awaiting the settlement of his just claims, and it is doubtful if there was ever a case of deserving need which he did not satisfy. He contributed of his time and means to all deserving people and worthy enterprises. He not only granted liberal extensions of time to his debtors, but went even further with an unostentatious liberality and charity to those who needed money, food or clothing. It is said that he had from $50 to $300 invested in every church in Washington Township. He gave liberally when call came in times of famine from other communities and states. He sent hundreds of bushels of corn out to the suffering people of Kansas during the early '60s, and contributed liberally to the donation taken up for the Nebraska pioneers whose crops were devastated by the grasshopper plague. What he did during the Civil War in his own community should not pass without notice. The outbreak of the war brought distress upon many households, and many who gladly volunteered to serve the cause of the Union had to leave their families almost unprovided. It is related that on one occasion when a company, made up of his neighbors and neighbor's boys, were about to leave for the South and were marching to the depot, Mr. Kent came on the scene and directed the captain to give the order to "open rank". The order was obeyed, Mr. Kent passed through from one end of the company to the other and gave to each man a $5 bill. Seldom was a gift more appropriate and timely, since a number of those volunteers had left their families practically in trust to the community.

Those who remember this splendid old citizen recall his more intimate characteristics. He was always busy, and industry was the keystone of his entire career. It is seldom that he appeared on the street except when called there by urgent business. He was conservative in temper and opinion, and while he exacted so much from himself he was none the less liberal in his sympathy for distress and his tolerance of the good and bad in others. In politics he was one of the pioneer democrats of Newton County.

His first wife was Mary Anna Chesebrough, who died November 26, 1856. In 1857 at Whitesboro, New York, he married Miss Rosamond C. Chesebrough. Her parents were Noyes P. and Clara (Moore) Chesebrough, her mother being a niece of the poet, Tom Moore. Mrs. Kent survived her husband several years and passed away December 24, 1886. Both are laid to rest in the Kentland Cemetery.

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JOHN ALEXANDER KENT. A life marked by splendid purpose, forceful energy, and an integrity of character which has been synonymous with the name during its long and honorable identification with New County, was that of the late John Alexander Kent. Mr. Kent was a son of Alexander J. and Rosamond C. Kent, who established their home in Kentland in 1859. The career of Alexander J. Kent, which figures so largely in the history of these counties, has been sketched on other pages.

John Alexander Kent was born at New Albany, Indian, October 17, 1858, and was therefore an infant when brought to Kentland. He grew up in that community, gained his education in the local schools, and from an early age began to share the responsibilities of his father's business, especially in looking after the extensive farm and cattle interest of his honored father.

In 1878 at the age of twenty he was given charge of the bookkeeping in his father's business. Later he took the management of the large cattle industry of the Kent family and in the early days he accompanied and sold many trainloads of stock in New York. From early years he manifested a soberness and seriousness under responsibilities that made him universally trusted. With his father's death in 1882 he took charge of and settled up the estate, the largest ever probated in Newton County. Thereafter, he managed the business affairs for his mother and other members of the family until his mother died in 1886.

With the division of the estate John A. Kent acquired a 10,000 acre ranch in Newton and Jasper Counties and 400 acres of land near Kentland. From that time forward he was actively identified with the livestock business, employing Mr. A. D.Washburn as manager, until his death which occurred in Phoenix, Arizona, February 12, 1897. Thus his career came to an untimely close before he was forty years of age.

Mr. Kent should be remembered because of his great executive ability, his dynamic energy and his able leadership in all affairs which required power and judgement of a vigorous self-sustaining manhood. Needless to say he possessed a prompt decision, and though a man of inmost courtesy and kindliness of heart and manner was exceedingly forceful in all he undertook. All in all he was one of Newton County's foremost business men and citizens.

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CARROLL CAREY KENT, the son of the late Alexander James Kent, founder of Kentland, and Rosamond (Chesebrough) Kent, was born in Newton County June 23, 1864. He is named for his paternal grandfather, reference to whom as well as to his honored father, Alexander J. Kent, is made on other pages.

Mr. C. C. Kent was educated in the Kentland public schools and in the preparatory school of Shobinger and Grant in Chicago, where he finished in 1882. On the death of his father on May 7, 1882, he returned to Kentland, and soon afterwards took charge with his brother, John Alexander, of the large landed interests of the family in Newton County. Mr. Kent has never married, but has none the less been closely identified with the business and civic life of his home town, and is well known in business circles in many of the larger cities of the country.

He has never aspired to political office, though for one term he was president of the board of education. Politically he is an independent democrat. He has filled chairs in both the Masonic and Knights of Pythias lodges in Kentland, and is a member of the Chicago Athletic Club and of the Lambs Club of New York. Mr. Kent regards with much satisfaction the development of athletics and outdoor recreation as an important feature of American life, and he himself participates in these sports, his favorites being fishing, hunting and golf.

In a business way much of his time and attention for a number of years have been taken up in the management of the landed interests, most of which were left in the estate of his father, Alexander J. Kent. He is also a member of the mercantile firm of J. W. Ryan and Company and is president of the Kent State Bank. This institution was founded in 1910 and is housed in one of the handsomest bank buildings in the State of Indiana. It is a solid and prosperous institution, and has made rapid progress under the management of Mr. Kent. In fact he has used his influence and means in many ways for the up building of Kentland. He has contributed to every worthy charity, and public enterprises without number might associate his name with substantial gifts and influence in the course of their progress.

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GEORGE B. PARKISON. Elsewhere in these pages will be found a number of references to members of the Parkison family, who have been identified with Jasper County since its early settlement. The pioneer of the family was John G. Parkison, whose grandson is George B. Parkison, who for many years has been closely identified with the agricultural interests of Marion Township. The latter's father was the late William K. Parkison. The lives of these two old settlers and the story of their accomplishments are told on other pages.

Few of the first residents of Jasper County have a more intimate knowledge based on practical experience with the successive changes in agricultural industry that have occurred in Jasper County during the last fifty years than George B. Parkison. He was born on his father's homestead in Barkley Township in Jasper County May 5, 1850. As a boy he had his first experience in farm management in directing the course of a single shovel corn cultivator across the fields of his father's farm. From that instrument he graduated to the double-shovel plow, and later to the two horse single row cultivator. Similarly he handled those primitive implements of the harvest field, the old fashioned cradle and scythe and has since introduced into his harvest field at successive periods some of the earlier types of the mowing and reaping machines, and still later the powerful and efficient self-binders, and the various other equipments which have lightened the labors of the farm. While farming as conducted thirty or forty years ago meant almost constant toil not only in the fields of growing crops but also in the necessary work of improvement, Mr. Parkison as a young man enjoyed an average amount of the recreations which the young people had in those days, chiefly in hunting, fishing and other sports. The training which comes from books and schools was not held in such high regard during his youth as it is in modern times, and perhaps was not so important a requisite in preparation for the stern duties to which boys were called when they reached manhood. However, Mr. Parkison attended the old district schools with more or less regularity, and when his services were required at home as his years and strength increased he gave his school attendance only the brief winter terms.

Mr. Parkison lived at home and was in partnership with his father in farming and stock raising until the latter's death. In the meantime, on August 13, 1879, he married Miss Ida A. Gwin, who died June 18, 1898. By their marriage there were three children, Clifford A., Mary Belle, now Mrs. James Monroe Yeoman, and one that died unnamed. On April 4, 1900, Mr. Parkison married Elizabeth Shook, who was born in Jasper County May 11, 1876, the seventh in a family of eight children, three sons and five daughters of William and Margaret J. (Dalton) Shook. All of the children are living, and reside principally in Indiana. Mr. Shook was born in Virginia, was an agriculturist, and was a staunch democrat in his political affiliations. Mrs. Shook was born in Jasper County, and both are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Parkison are the parents of one son, Allen H.

Farming and stock raising has been his vocation since early manhood. Prior to his father's death considerable attention was paid to the raising of thoroughbred Shorthorn cattle, but of late years Mr. Parkison has followed general diversified farming. He has one of the fine farms of Marion Township, comprising 285 acres, with an attractive home and all the facilities and conveniences that make country life comfortable. He is a republican in politics, though never a seeker for public office. Fraternally he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and has been affiliated with that order for more than twenty-five years.

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SAMPSON RAVENSCROFT. Few people have continuously witnessed and participated in the development and change that have occurred in Carpenter Township during the past six decades. It is the distinction of Sampson RAVENSCROFT and of his venerable mother, now a nonagenarian, to have live on one farm, only a few miles from the Village of Remington, ever since the fall of 1855. Samson Ravenscroft at that time was only a child, but he has a deep recollection of many items in the pioneer experience and has himself done not a little toward the breaking up of wild virgin soil, the felling of timber, the clearing up of ground and planting it for the first time in grain and making it over to the uses and benefits of civilization.

His father was the late Edward Ravenscroft, a son of John Ravenscroft, who was of German descent. Edward was born in Virginia, November 25, 1811, and for a number of years lived in Hampshire County in that part of old Virginia subsequently detached and made in the new state of West Virginia. From Hampshire County he brought his little family in the fall of 1855 out to Carpenter Township, Section 17, Range 6, West, and located on the very farm where his son, Sampson, and his venerable widow now reside. Edward Ravenscroft was a farmer nearly all his life, voted the republican ticket after the organization of that party, but aside from casting his ballot as intelligently as possible took no part in politics. He and his wife were members of the United Brethren Church. Edward Ravenscroft died May 26, 1900, when well upwards of ninety years of age, and was laid to rest in the Remington Cemetery.

On August 11, 1842, in Hampshire County, Virginia, Edward Ravenscroft and Sarah Flick were united in marriage. She is also of part German descent, and a daughter of Henry and Nancy (Spencer) Flick. To their union were born eight children: Mary J. married J. F. Irwin, and they live in Rensselaer; David married Sophia Cross, and they live in Gray, Oklahoma; Sampson was the third in order of birth; Sarah A. is the wife of J. F. Rank, and living in Chicago; Nancy C. married A. M. Horner, and they live in Kingman, Kansas; Henry K. lives in Bentonville, Arkansas, and married Hattie Cross; Jasper B. is now deceased; Isabella M. is the wife of G. L. Parks and lives in Milroy Township.

There is no person now living in Carpenter Township who surpasses in length of years Mrs. Edward Ravenscroft, who was born April 27, 1822, and is now in her ninety-fourth year. James Monroe was President of the United States when she was born, and in the span of her life the American frontier has been extended from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Coast, and all the great inventions and improvements which have transformed the world have taken place.

Sampson Ravenscroft, who still occupies the old farm and lives with his mother, in deference to whose wishes he has never married, was born in Hampshire County, Virginia, December 5, 1848. Farming has been his chosen vocation, and he has been known as an upright, industrious and capable citizen, as a boy he remembers the old time wagons with their linchpin and recalls the introduction of practically every improved device for cultivating the land and harvesting the crops, from the cradle and the wooden moldboard plow down to the modern self-binder and the gasoline tractor. He and his mother have a fine farm of eighty acres situated 2 miles northeast of Remington. When they came to this community sixty years ago there was only one close neighbor, a Mr. Kennard and family. Mr. Ravenscroft is a republican, but never sought office, and has no membership in secret orders or church.

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LEWIS S. ALTER. By his character and achievement this well known citizen of Jasper County has upheld and advanced the prestige of a family name that has been significantly prominent and influential in connection with civic and industrial development and progression this favored section of Indiana, and that has been worthily linked with American annals since the Colonial era of our national history. He whose name initiates this paragraph resides on the old homestead farm which was the place of his birth, in Section 21, Range 7 West, Carpenter Township, Jasper County, and he not only owns and gives supervision to one of the valuable landed estates of his native county, but has also held for many years distinct precedence as one of the representative surveyors and civil engineers of Northern Indiana, his services in his profession having extended greatly beyond the limitations of his native county. Both as an honored and influential citizen and as a scion of one of the sterling pioneer families of Jasper County is he specially entitled to recognition in this publication, and it may further be said that he has shown deep interest in his family genealogy, has devoted much time and attention to tracing and recording interesting ancestral data, and is at present time historian of the Alter family organization, the annual reunions of which have become occasions of more than ordinary historic interest. Mr. Alter has at the present time the distinction of being the oldest native-born resident of Carpenter Township. He was born on the 22nd of June, 1851, and is a son of John and Mary Ann (Chamberlin) Alter.

The original American progenitors of the Alter family came from Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, and they were George Heinrich Alter, who was born in or near Hesse-Darmstadt, and his two sons, Johan Jacob and George Friedrich. George Heinrich Alter was born about the year 1720, as nearly as can be determined by records extant, and in 1753 he came with his two sons to America, the voyage having been initiated when they embarked at Rotterdam, Holland, on the sailing vessel that bore the name of "Beulah", and that was commanded by Captain Rickey. On page 380 of Volume XIII, Pennsylvania Archives, it is recorded that Johan Jacob and George Friedrich Alter were qualified as citizens, at Philadelphia, September 10, 1753. Johan Jacob Alter took the oath of allegiance at Euphrata, as of Cocallico Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in 1788, as shown on page 46 of the same volume of the Pennsylvania Archives; and in Volume X, page 414, Second Series of the Pennsylvania Archives, it is shown that he was enrolled in the Army of the Revolution, in the Second Battalion, Pennsylvania Line, United States Infantry. Johan Jacob Alter seems to have eliminated his first personal name and the greater part of the official records pertaining to him designate him simply as Jacob Alter. From the report of the committee on history of the Alter family presented at the family reunion of 1900, and subsequently issued in pamphlet form, are taken the following pertinent statements: "In the Third Series of the Pennsylvania Archives, Volume II, page 608, in the list of 'Soldiers Entitled to Donation Lands', for military services, we find 'Jacob Alter, private Second Infantry, 200 acres'. We have not been able to find any record at Harrisburg showing that this land was ever taken, and we may assume that our ancestor did not care to be compensated for serving his country."

Between the years 1760 and 1767 Jacob Alter married Margaret Landis, daughter of Henry and Veronica (Graafe) Landis, and of the ten children of this union, John, the second in order of birth, was the grandfather of him whose name initiates this article. John Alter was born September 13, 1771, and he married Helenor Sheets. Concerning the children of Jacob and Margaret (Landis) Alter the following authentic data are entitled to preservation in this connections: Veronica, born October 9, 1769, married Lawrence LaFever; John, born September 13, 1771, married Helenor Sheets; Jacob, born January 1, 1773, married Elizabeth Foutz; David, born February 7, 1775, married Elizabeth Mell; Esther, born February 28, 1777, married Michael Baer; Samuel, born Mar 17 1779, died young; Susanna, born October 25, 1784, married Maria Elizabeth Reinhard; Abraham, born March 13, 1787, died unmarried; and Margaret, born March 23, 1790, became the wife of a Mr. McCullough. Margaret (Landis) Alter, mother of the above named children, was a daughter of Henry and Veronica (Graafe) Landis. Henry Landis was a son of Benjamin Landis, who came from Switzerland and settled in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, prior to the year 1720, and who took up 800 acres of land; he was a preacher of the Mennonite denomination. The wife of Henry Landis was a daughter of Hans Graafe, who came from Switzerland in 1696, first locating in Philadelphia, and eventually becoming an extensive landholder and influential citizen of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

Jacob Alter disposed of his holding in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in 1779, when he removed with his family to Cumberland County, where he established a mill and acquired large tracts of land, a portion of which is still in the possession of his descendants. Within the first decade of the nineteenth century Jacob Alter removed to Washington County, where he purchased property and where he died prior to August, 1815. He represented Cumberland County in seven consecutive sessions of the Pennsylvania Legislature, 1799-1805. It may be noted that his son-in-law, Joseph Ritner, was elected governor of Pennsylvania in 1835, and served until 1839. His name, it has been said, "will be classed by Pennsylvania among the noblest on her long list, for his well-timed and determined support of the free school". In his annual message of 1836 he discussed the slavery question in a manner that caused the poet Whittier to write a stirring lyric of appreciation and addressed to Governor Ritner.

John Alter, Jr., son of John, who was a son of Jacob, mentioned in the foregoing paragraphs, was born in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, on the 1st of July, 1801. He was reared and educated in the old Keystone State, where he continued his residence until 1836, when he came to Indiana and numbered himself among the pioneer settlers of Greenfield Township, Hancock County. He and his family removed to Howard County about 1840, and he himself, with the other members of his family, settled in Carpenter Township, Jasper County, in 1858. But his two sons, John and David, came to Jasper County in 1846, and they were the first to settle on the Grand Prairie and at some distance from the timbered sections of the county.

John Alter (II) first married Miss Charity Van Ausdall, and they became the parents of eight children, concerning whom the following brief data are available: Helen M. was the first ordained female minister of the Methodist Protestant Church in the United States, and continued her active service as a minister for nearly thirty years prior to her death; John W., Isaac V. and David are deceased; Mrs. Esther Smith is a resident of the State of Colorado; and Hannah, Jacob and Benjamin are deceased.

After the death of his first wife, John Alter (II) wedded Lucinda J. Black, daughter of Samuel Black of Howard County, and they became the parents of two children, Isabel J., who is now deceased, and Nancy J., who died in infancy. The second wife did not survive many years, and on the 4th of January, 1749, John Alter was united in marriage to Miss Mary Ann Chamberlin, daughter of Joseph and Margaret Chamberlin, of Tippecanoe County, her father having been the first hotel-keeper at Bradford, now the City of Monon, White County. Of the eight children of this marriage the first-born, Joseph L., died in infancy; Lewis S. is the immediate subject of this review; Catherine L., Margaret L. and Martha D. are deceased; James L. is a member of the family circle of his brother, Lewis S.; Lacy E. is a resident of the City of Boise, Idaho; and Mrs. Mary C. Tolles maintains her home at Lansing, the capital of the State of Michigan.

John Alter (II) was a man of strong and vigorous mentality and his life was ordered upon the highest plane of integrity and honor. He had served zealously as a preacher of the Methodist Protestant Church, was an implacable adversary of the liquor traffic, and in the climacteric period leading up to the Civil War he was an ardent abolitionist. This honored pioneer of Jasper County died on his old homestead farm, in Carpenter Township, on the 15th of October, 1876, and his mortal remains rest in the old family graveyard, on the homestead place. It may consistently be noted that his brother, Dr. David Alter, with the assistance of his niece, Miss Helenor Alter, invented and placed in operation successfully, in Greenfield, Hancock County, Indiana, in 1837, an electric telegraph system, this being six years before Morse obtained his patent for similar instruments. At a later date Doctor Alter made important discoveries in spectral analysis, and he published a treatise on the same, though Professor Wykhoff, of Germany, received credit for the discoveries, notwithstanding that his experiments and research were made several years later. Dr. Simon Alter, a younger brother, became a prominent physician and representative citizen of Rensselaer, Indiana.

Prior to her marriage Mrs. Mary Ann (Chamberlin) Alter, a woman of most gracious personality and of excellent intellectual attainments, had the distinction of being the teacher of the first school established south of Rensselaer in Jasper County. This was a subscription school and its dignified sessions were held in a primitive log house about three miles northeast of the present Village of Remington, in the year 1848. The first definite school house erected for the purpose south of Rensselaer was a log building situated at the crossroads in Section 13, Range 7 West, Carpenter Township, where Moses Sigo now has his substantial farm residence. In 1858, 1859 and 1860. Mrs. Mary Ann Alter taught school in her own home, and in the summer of 1860 she presided over the classes in a public school maintained for two months in the barn on the Alter farm. Her death occurred March 22, 1889, and her remains rest beside those of her husband in the old family cemetery in Carpenter Township. It was the privilege of Lewis S. Alter to be reared in a home of distinctive intellectual atmosphere and marked refinement, and in addition to profiting duly from the lessons received at the hands of his devoted mother he availed himself fully of the advantages of the schools of his native county, besides which his studies in higher and technical lines gave him his ultimate facility and prestige as a surveyor and civil engineer, the work of his profession having received his attention for fully thirty-five years. He served six years as county surveyor of Jasper County; for four years he had virtual charge of the office of county surveyor of St. Joseph County, in the City of South Bend, where he served simultaneously as assistant city engineer; and for three years he held, under the administration of Edward Hamilton and the latter's son, John J., a similar position in the office of the county surveyor of Newton County, besides which he has been retained as an authority and expert in practical engineering in several other Indiana counties, his work having thus covered a large field and much of it having been of important order.

In 1882 Mr. Alter was the dominating figure in effecting the organization of the Indiana Engineering Society, whose membership comprises the various county surveyors and other civil engineers of the state, and this has the distinction of being one of the oldest and most vigorous in the United States. He was elected the first vice president of the society and thereafter served several years as its secretary. He is now a retired honorary member of this organization. Mr. Alter is historian of the Alter family, and is at the present time engaged in compiling a comprehensive and authoritative genealogical record of the various branches of the family. He has been a close and appreciative student from his early years to the present time, and his private library is the largest and most select to be found in Carpenter Township.

He has long been an influential and zealous member of the Mount Hope Church, Methodist Protestant, of which he is a trustee, and his devoted wife likewise was an earnest member of the same for many years prior to her death, which occurred June 21, 1913, the mortal remains of this gentle and loved woman being interred in the family cemetery. Mr. Alter is affiliated with both the lodge and encampment bodies of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Remington, and has passed the various official chairs in the same.

On the 17th of February, 1879, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Alter to Miss Sarah Ellen Nash, a daughter of James and Minerva J. (Keesling) Nash, of Gillam Township, Jasper County. Of the ten children of this union all survive the devoted mother with the exception of the ninth child, Jesse. The names of the others are here entered in respective order of birth: John J., Mary B., Charles B., Minnie D., Christmas E., Lewis F., Myrtle E., Lacy H., and Lester D. Mary B. is the wife of Robert H. Stanley, and they reside at LaCrosse, LaPorte County; Lewis F., who resides in the vicinity of Burge, Nebraska; Minnie D. is a trained nurse by profession and resides in the City of Lafayette, Indiana. Mr. Alter wedded for his second wife, Mrs. Cynthia A. (Musgrove) Price, February 17, 1916. She is a native of Howard County, Indiana. Her first marriage was with Mr. E. Price, and two living children, both daughters, were born. The eldest is Marie, the wife of Walter Baugher, of Kokomo, Indiana, a plumber. They have one son, Raymond. Dorothy resides with her mother. Mrs. Alter is a member of the Holiness Church.

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WILLIAM DARROCH. He was born December 31, 1848, at Rockville, Parke County, Indiana, a son of John Darroch and a grandson of Daniel Darroch. His grandfather came from North Carolina and his ancestors were from the North of Scotland. John Darroch, who was born at Paola, Orange County, Indiana, in 1820, located in Newton County in 1851. Though a graduate of the Indiana Law School at Bloomington, he spent his active career as a farmer and stockman. He became the father of nineteen children, sixteen of whom grew to maturity and twelve of whom are still living. These were by two wives, six by the first and thirteen by the second. William Darroch's mother was Caroline Puett, of Rockville, Indiana, and a daughter of Austin M. Puett, a pioneer from North Carolina.

William Darroch grew up on his father's farm in Newton County, and received a thorough practical training in the industry of cattle raising. He was too young for service in the Civil War, though two of his older brothers went into the Union army, and their absence from home threw upon his young shoulders at the age of fourteen the duties and responsibilities of a grown man. From 1871 to 1874 Mr. Darroch was a student in old Asbury, now DePauw University at Greencastle, Indian and was graduated with the class of 1874 Bachelor of Science. In connection with other studies he took the law course, and his career ever since he began practice in the spring of 1875 has been primarily devoted to this great profession. In 1890 he was appointed by Governor Mathews judge of the Thirtieth Judicial Circuit of the state, but served only four months, being defeated at the next regular election.

On July 23, 1878, Mr. Darroch married Emma V. Sammons, who was born at Wellandport, Canada. To their marriage have been born two daughters, Ethel M. and Laura V. Ethel is married and has two sons, William and Robert.

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EDGAR L. BRUCE. Here is a name that has been identified with Jasper County more than sixty years. It has become honored and respected through long years of successive industry, business integrity and moral character. Few families of the county have be longer established, and none have borne their part in community affairs with greater credit to themselves and with more practical usefulness to the community than the Bruces. The late Henry C. Bruce was an early settler, a thrifty farmer and stock man, developing a large tract of land and becoming known all over this part of Indiana for his ability in handling stock, and he left a fine family to honor his memory and to continue the good work begun by him in the early days. Two of his brothers, Lawrence and Charles Bruce, accompanied him to Lafayette, Indiana. Lawrence Bruce died in Rensselaer in 1852, at the age of about forty-five years, and had served as county recorder. Charles Bruce died in Lawrence, Kansas, about 1855. He had been a very successful lumber merchant there for about forty years.

One of Henry's sons, Edgar L. Bruce, was born June 14 1851, and his birthplace is in easy view of his present residence in Marion Township of Jasper County. He is one of the six living children in a family of eight born to Henry C. and Harriet E. (Babcock) Bruce, his father having been born near Rutland, Vermont, and his mother near Rochester, New York. The names of their children were: Elbert J., who died at the age of twenty-two; Edgar L.; Annette, who is now Mrs. Warren B. Rowley and lives in South Dakota; Ruby, Mrs. George Barcus of Wabash, Indiana; Adaline, Mrs. B. E. Comer of Union Township, Jasper County; Charles F., who married Anna Wilson and lives in California; George, who married Edna Watson of Stuttgart, Arkansas; and Harry, who died when three years of age. All but the last of these children grew to useful manhood and womanhood, and they were all school teachers at some time in their lives. Henry C. Bruce, who was reared as a farmer with New England antecedents, came west to Indiana in the late '30s or early '40s, and for a time was engaged in teaching in the public schools of Lafayette. Subsequently he was in the mercantile business at Delphi. In the latter part of the '40s he removed to Jasper County, which though it had been organized in 1837 still have a population to the square mile hardly as great as will now be found in the semi-arid districts of the Far West. Thus he came upon the stage of pioneer life in Jasper County, and was able to secure 640 acres of land direct from the government at the regulation price of a dollar and a quarter per acre. His land was in Sections 4 and 5 in Marion Township, southeast of Rensselaer, a part of which family estate is now owned by his son, Edgar L. Bruce. Henry C. Bruce on securing this land built from rough lumber a house of limited comfort and conveniences, and started the heavy task of clearing and improving his land. His lot was that of the early pioneer, with all its hardships and privations, and he was a factor in the many changes that occurred during the last half of the nineteenth century, spent his later years in prosperity and comfort and died in April, 1900. He was a man above the average even of the hardy pioneers. He possessed a collegiate education, and was always well informed on the subject of current interests. He joined the Baptist Church at Lafayette about 1848, and after removing to Jasper County became one of the organizers of the Missionary Baptist Church at Rensselaer, in which church he held office and active membership to the day of his death. While living on and occupying the large farm, he was essentially a stockman. He raised large herds of cattle and sheep, and proved unusually skillful and successful in handling stock. Physically he was a large man, stood six feet in his stockings, had a corresponding vigor and vitality, and his many sterling qualities commanded the respect of an entire community. In the early days, like his neighbors, the latchstring of his home was always on the outside for the wayfarer, and it said that no one ever left his home hungry. Though a strong republican, he was never an aspirant for public office. He died at Rensselaer at the home of a married daughter.

With the example of his father before him, Edgar L. Bruce has spent all his life in Jasper County, and is a product of its early institutions and environment. His education came from the neighboring district schools, and like the other children he qualified himself for the duties of a teacher. He started out for himself at the age of twenty-one, though still making his home with his parents. On March 1, 1877, he was married to Miss Kansas Lefler, a daughter of Michael and Jane (Overton) Lefler, who were Jasper County farmers. To their marriage were born three children: Lora L., wife of John G. Culp; Harley, who lives near Crawfordsville, Indiana; and Lawson L., whose home is in Rensselaer.

The attractive farm home of Mr. Bruce comprises 200 acres of land and practically his entire life has been spent in the immediate neighborhood of his birth. He is a republican of the stalwart kind, while he and his wife are members of the Baptist Church of Rensselaer.

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GEORGE CULP. Of those names which are identified with the very earliest settlement of Jasper County that of Culp is one that claims attention, and on other pages various references are made to the Culps in Barkley Township.

The founder of the family was George Culp, who was born in West Virginia, or as it was then western Virginia, March 8, 1800. He grew up in his home state, and on December 7, 1827 married Mary Burton. His brother-in-law was Samuel Randle, another of the most prominent pioneers of Jasper County, whose sketch will be found on other pages. Culp and Randle both emigrated from the East to Indiana in 1832, and in the fall of 1834, leaving their families in Tippecanoe County, they came into what is now Barkley Township of Jasper County and spent several months in cutting hay and building log cabins, to which they removed their families in the following year. George Culp and wife had the following children: Harriett Ann, William., James, Elizabeth J., Maria, John T., Matilda P., Nancy R., Rachel J. and Walter. Of these Rachel J., Walter and John T. are still living. George Culp the pioneer died April 18, 1847, survived by his widow until October 22, 1871. Both were Methodist Church people and were among the first members of that society in Jasper County.

Of the children of George Culp and wife, John T. Culp was born December 1, 1836, and is one of the oldest native sons of Jasper County, having been born in Barkley Township before the formal organization of Jasper County. He is a man of many interesting recollections, and recalls some of his early experiences with farming methods long since obsolete. In the early days he watched the men thresh the wheat by driving horses around over the unthreshed straw, trampling out the grain with their feet. He has also seen the work so familiar among the pioneers of hackling flax. He grew up in Barkley Township and for seventy-three years lived on the place where he was born, a substantial farm of ninety-eight acres. The last six years he has spent retired in Rensselaer. John T. Culp married Mrs. Victoria (Wade) Tennehill. Their two children were: Ursula, who died in early childhood; and John G., who is a farmer of Marion Township.

John G. Culp was born May 20, 1874. He was married April 10, 1912 to Lora L. Bruce, daughter of Edgar L. Bruce. Mr. and Mrs. John G. Culp have one daughter, Mary Kathryn, born December 6, 1913.

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B. FRANK ALTER. One of the well known residents of Rensselaer is B. Frank Alter, who was born in Clinton County, Indiana, February 28, 1865. His father, Benjamin F. Alter was born in Pennsylvania, February 8, 1835, a son of John Alter. He married Louisa V. Sims, and of their eight children two are now deceased. When Benjamin F. Alter died in Clinton County on December 4, 1914, he left a record which may properly be prized by his descendants. He was hard working, and that quality was the foundation of his success, and in his lifetime he had accumulated property to the value of about $40,000, a very comfortable fortune. Fraternally he was affiliated with the Masonic Order and was a member of the Baptist Church.

B. Frank Alter spent his early life on the farm, and gained his education in the public schools and at Franklin College. Possessing good native business ability, he has applied himself successfully to a varied line of enterprises. For a time he operated a sawmill in North Carolina and for eight years had the management of the tile factory located two miles north of Rensselaer. For several years his home has been in Rensselaer and his somewhat extensive interests in farming and other affairs give him ample occupation for his time and energies. He is the owner of eighty acres of land in Jasper County and also has some property in Clinton County.

In politics Mr. Alter is a democrat. He was married December 24, 1905, to Miss Maude Hemphill, daughter of Marcus H. and Matilda J. (Baker) Hemphill of Rensselaer, and Mrs. Alter is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

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MOSES F. FRENCH. His is one of the old American families. His grandfather, Aaron French, was born September 8, 1739, nearly half a century before the American colonies were united under the constitution as a Union of States. He died August 31, 1805, at Amity, Pennsylvania. The father of the Remington octogenarian was Asa French, who was the seventh child by Aaron French's marriage to Mary Clark. Asa was born July 8, 1780, in Essex County, New Jersey, and died August 9, 1845, in Miami County, Ohio. He moved from Greene County, Pennsylvania, to Miami County, Ohio, in 1811, and was one of the very early settlers in that part of the Buckeye State. In 1801 he married for his first wife, Sarah Jackson, who was born April 24, 1780, and died March 26, 1820. She became the mother of eleven children. Asa French married for his second wife, Hannah Davis, who was born February 19, 1800, near Lexington, Kentucky, and died near Troy, Ohio, March 5, 1883. The oldest living child of Asa French is Mrs. Sarah French Ripley, who is now living at Brookston and is probably the oldest person in White County. She was born June 25, 1825. By his second marriage Asa French had twelve children, and altogether was the father of twenty-three. He followed farming as his occupation, was an energetic and hard working citizen, and came of the strong, long lived stock that is characteristic of this family.

The seventh of his mother's twelve children, Moses Frazer French was born February 21, 1832, near Troy, Miami County, Ohio. His lifetime covers a period of more than fourscore years, and his birth occurred while Andrew Jackson was still president of the United States. As a boy he had limited schooling in such institutions as were maintained on the subscription plan in his native section of Ohio, and most of his discipline came by hard work on the home farm until he was twenty-four years of age. In 1856, Mr. French came to Indiana and located in Prairie Township of White County, where he engaged in farming until crsipelas crippled him for that work and he then returned to Miami County. From 1860 to 1865 he employed his time in teaching school in his native county, and then returned to Prairie Township, White County.

On March 6, 1806, Mr. French married Martha Catherine Jordan. Her father, William Jordan, was on of the very early settlers in White County. Mrs. French died October 7, 1878, and is buried in the Gilboa Cemetery in Benton County. There is only one child by her marriage, Independence, now the wife of Harry Balthis, a paymaster in the United States navy, and their home is at Washington. Mr. and Mrs. Balthis have three children, Madge M., Edith and Herbert. On August 2, 1888, Mr. French married for his second wife, Sarah Belle Pitts. Her family were also among the early settlers of White County.

Though not a politician, Mr. French has long been identified with the republican party, practically ever since its organization, filled a place on the town board of Brookston and was one of the school trustees there. Though past eighty years of age, Mr. French is a wonderfully well preserved man, is large and strong and has a heart as big as his body.

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ABRAM F.LONG/SAMUEL LONG. One of the oldest and best known business men of Rensselaer is Abram F. Long, son of the pioneer Samuel Long. The first settler, Samuel Long, was born in the State of Maryland in 1824 and there grew to manhood and served an apprenticeship at the tailor's trade, though he never followed that as a vocation. In early manhood he made a journey through the West, and was so attracted by the appearance of the country around Rensselaer that he decided to locate there permanently.

His first marriage was with a Miss Stewart, who became the mother of a son and a daughter, both of them now deceased. After her death Samuel Long married Sarah Ann Freeland, whose parents were early settlers in Jasper County. To their marriage were born five children, and the three that reached maturity were Abram F., Edward and Addie, the last being the wife of W. W. Miller of Mount Ayr. He died March 13, 1895, and his widow survived him until February 8, 1910.

His son, Abram F. Long, has for many years been proprietor of the leading drug store at Rensselaer. He was born November 7, 1862, on the old homestead in Newton Township of Jasper County, and was reared there and in Newton County, whither his parents removed when he was a boy. His early education came from the public schools, and when about eighteen he acquired his first experience in the business which has subsequently become his permanent vocation by hiring out as a clerk in a drug store at Rensselaer. A year later he returned to the home farm and assisted in its cultivation until he was twenty-two. In 1883, he again came to Rensselaer as a drug clerk, followed that employment three years, and then with an eye to the future took a short course in Chicago School of Pharmacy. This was followed by another experience as a clerk, and in 1886, he returned to the Chicago College of Pharmacy from which he was graduated with his diploma in the spring of 1887. As a registered pharmacist he had some experience in the city of Chicago, and from there returned to Rensselaer and became a partner in a local drug store. In 1890, he bought out his partner, and since that time the drug store of A. F. Long has been one of the business fixtures of Rensselaer, and its continuous standing of a quarter of a century makes it one of the oldest concerns in the city. About 1907 Mr. Long bought the ground and erected the home of his present business.

On September 25, 1889, Mr. Long married Elizabeth Purcupile, a daughter of Archibald and Elizabeth (Howe) Purcupile. They have one of the comfortable homes of Rensselaer and their marriage has been blessed by the birth of two children: George A. and Martha. The son, George A. Long, after graduating from Rensselaer High School spent two years in the University of Illinois at Champaign. He later graduated form the College of Pharmacy in Chicago, and is now associated with his father in the drug business at Rensselaer. He married Miss Nell Moody, a daughter of Granville Moody, of Rensselaer, and they have two daughters, Elizabeth Jane and Eleanor Martin. Martha, the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Long, graduated from the Rensselaer High School and then spent two years in the Women's College at Oxford, Ohio. She is now the wife of Russell E. Strawbridge, of Niagara Falls, New York, where he is an electrician. Mr. Long is a popular member of the community, is affiliated with the Masonic Lodge and the Knights of Pythias, in politics is a republican, and he and his family are members of the Presbyterian Church.

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LOUIS H HAMILTON has filled a useful and honorable place in Jasper County for many years. The record of his life is one that affords lessons of incentive to young men who start out without influential family connections and with no means beyond their individual ability to make a mark in the world.

At the age of two years, Louis Hayes Hamilton was left an orphan in Indianapolis, and spent the next six years in an orphan home. He was then placed with a farmer, John G. Culp, in Barkley Township of Jasper County, and remained in his home until he was fourteen, when he ran away, and has since been the sole guide of his individual destiny. Hard manual labor was naturally an important part of his early experience, but while working in a tile factory he lost his right arm at the age of fifteen and had to turn his energies in another direction. He sought an education, and in 1891 graduated from the Rensselaer High School, and subsequently attended the Valparaiso University and the Indiana State Normal School at Terre Haute.

A great many people in Jasper and other counties of the state know Mr. Hamilton best through his long associations with educational affairs. He holds a life state teacher's license. He taught many terms of school in the various districts of Jasper County, and from 1897 to 1907 administered the entire school system of the county as county superintendent. During that time he was president of the County Superintendents' State Association and was also vice president of the Indiana State Teachers' Association.

Mr. Hamilton is a director in the Trust and Savings Bank of Rensselaer, is a trustee of the public library and a trustee of the County Hospital. Politically he is a republican. He is a past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias Lodge, is a past noble grand of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has held the post of inner guard in the Grand Lodge, and is past chief patriarch of the Encampment. He is also a member of the Columbia Club of Indianapolis. Mr. Hamilton is elder and president of the board of the Christian Church of Rensselaer.

On September 24, 1894, in Hanging Grove Township of Jasper County, he married Mary Robinson, daughter of George and Rebecca Robinson. They have two children: Fred H. Hamilton, who is twenty-one years of age, and is connected with the Daily Courier-News at Fargo, North Dakota; and Marie Hamilton, aged eighteen, and a student in Butler University.

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THE PECK FAMILY For the past forty years this family has been one of prominence and influence in Jasper County, and its representatives have been primarily identified with the civic and business activities of the thriving village of Remington.

Daniel W. Peck, who figures as the founder of the family in Jasper County, and who established his residence at Remington in the year 1875, traced his genealogy in a direct way back to Joseph Peck, who, in company with a brother, Rev. Robert Peck, was prompted in large measure by religious persecution to leave his native England and seek the greater liberties of conscience and of thought and action that were to be had in new and far distant colonies of America. The two brothers thus came to this country in the year 1638, and they established a home in the Massachusetts colony, the family name having been one of prominence in New England annals as one generation has followed another on to the stage of life's activities, and numerous representatives of the name having gone forth to uphold the prestige of an honored patronymic in various other states of the Union.

Daniel W. Peck was born at Salem, Washington County, Indiana, on the 29th of July, 1839, a date that indicates beyond all peradventure that his parents were numbered among the early pioneers of the Hoosier commonwealth. He was a son of Oliver Peck and a grandson of Samuel Peck. In the county of his nativity he was reared to manhood and there, on the 11th of November, 1862, was solemnized his marriage to Miss Elizabeth Lockwood. He initiated his business career as clerk in a store at Salem and later engaged in the mercantile business in an independent way, in his native county. At the time, within the period of the Civil war, that General Morgan, the intrepid Confederate commander, made his famous raids into Indiana and Ohio he made one of his distinctively unpopular visitations to the town of Salem, where he laid heavy tribute on all who professed sympathy with the Union cause. It was but natural that his depredations should touch with special vigor Daniel W. Peck, who was then engaged in business at that place, and who was not only ardent and fearless in his loyal work and labors in behalf of the Union but who also had brothers in active service as soldiers in the Federal ranks. The goods of Mr. Peck's store were virtually confiscated by General Morgan and his band of raiders, and such articles of the stock as they could not carry away and utilize they effectually destroyed. Mr. Peck was not discouraged in that he had thus to bear his quota of the hardships of the war, but he replenished his store and again developed a substantial business, only to meet heavy losses at later periods, through burglary and fire.

In 1875, as previously intimated, Mr. Peck removed with his family to Jasper County and established his home at Remington, where he engaged in the general merchandise business. Adverse conditions faced him in the new field of endeavor, for it is a matter of well known local history that the years 1875, 1876 and 1877 were marked by extreme financial depression and attendant panic and distress in Jasper County. Crops were practical failures and credit was an imperative element in the carrying on of retail mercantile enterprises. Hundreds of families removed from this section of Indiana to Kansas and other sections of the Union, virtually fleeing in consternation and with little preparation, besides which many of them failed to make good their financial obligations in the old homes prior to their hurried departure. The capitalistic resources of Mr. Peck were limited and his widely extended credits made impossible to overcome the adverse forces when he was unable to realize to an appreciable degree on these credits. Steadfast and true in all of the relations of life, he again faced financial disaster with fortitude, but while he measurable retrieved his fortunes there can be little doubt that his successive encounters with the "slings and arrows of outrageous fortune" did much to break down his physical powers and to cause his death while in the prime of his useful manhood. He passed away in November, 1885, and his devoted wife survived him by nearly a score of years, she having been summoned to eternal rest on the 29th of June, 1905, and having continued to maintain her home at Remington until her demise. All of the seven children were reared to maturity at Remington, and individual mention of them is made in the appending paragraphs.

Charles H. Peck, eldest of the children, was born at Salem, on the 2nd of October, 1863, and thus was alad of twelve years at the time of the family removal to Remington, where he continued his studies in the public schools and where he began his business career as a youthful clerk in a local mercantile establishment. In September, 1895, he initiated in a modest way his independent activities as a merchant in Remington, and by fair and honorable dealings, careful and effective service to patrons, and progressive policies he developed with a comparatively brief period a substantial business. In 1906 his establishment was converted into a general department store, and in the conducting of the large and representative business three rooms on the street level are utilized,besides which the upper floor and basement of the buildings are also demanded for the accomodation of the varied stock and the proper service in the various departments. An idea of the comprehensiveness of this admirable conducted business is conveyed when it is stated that the valuation of the stock carried may be conservatively placed at or about $30,000 and that in the well appointed establishment, employment is given to a corps of seven assistants. Mr. Peck holds secure prestige as one of the representative business men and loyal and public-spirited citizens of Jasper County, and it may be said with all of consistency that he is at the present time the leading merchant of Remington. He is affiliated with the local organizations of the Masonic fraternity Remington Lodge No. 351 and the Knights of Pythias Castle Hall No. 58. Mr. Peck wedded Miss Alice Allman. In writing of her death a local publication used the following well chosen words:
"Alice A. Allman, daughter of Josiah H. and Mary C. Allman, was born at Navarre, Ohio, March 8, 1858, and passed away at her late home in Remington, Indiana April 3, 1916. She was united in marriage to Charles H. Peck, June 13, 1886. To this union was born three children, Mrs. H. H. Bowman, of Monticello, and Fred Peck and Miss Laura Peck, of Remington.

She leaves to mourn her loss, her husband, Charles H. Pek, the two daughters and one son just mentioned, her mother, Mrs. Mary C. Allman, of Remington, her brother, Jesse Allman, of Rensselaer, an only sister, Mrs. Ida Coover, of Denver, Colorado, and two grandchildren, besides a large number of other relatives. Her circle of friends was bounded only by her acquaintances, and her untimely taking away will cause sorrow and regret in the hearts of all who knew her.

On Thursday, April 6th, a large concourse of friends gathered at the late home to pay the last public tribute of love and respect to her memory. The funeral sermon was preached by H. Randal Lookabill, of Crawfordsville, who is a close friend of the family, and for several years was Mrs. Peck's pastor. He was assisted by Rev. Konkel, the present pastor of the Remington Christian Church. The interment took place at the Remington Cemetery."

WILLIAM E. PECK, THE SECOND SON IN THIS REPRESENTATIVE FAMILY OF Jasper County, became one of the most prominent and influential citizens of the sourthern part of the county. For some time he held the position of engineer for A. Wolcott & Son, engaged in the grain business, and later he was associated with the business of the firm of Hartley Brothers. Under the first administrative term of President McKinley Mr. Peck was appointed postmaster of Remington, and through successive reappointments he continued the incumbent of this office for sixteen years. He was a man of large physique, was genial, kindly, courtious and considerate, and his circle of friends was coextensive with that of his acquaintances. He wa specially active in the Masonic fraternity and the Knight of Pythias, and, like his father and brothers, was a stalwart advocate of the cause of the republican party. In September, 1914, he removed with his family to beautiful Chautauqua County, New York, where he had purchased a fine farm of 200 acres, but he was not long permitted to enjoy the new home, for he died on the 12th of January, 1915--the forty-ninth anniversary of his birth. His wife, whose maiden name was Lottie E. Coover, survives him, as do also their five children.

FRANK L. PECK was born in Washington County, this state, on the 9th of October, 1874, and in the following year his parents removed to Remington, where he has since maintained his home and where his early educational advantages were thos of the excellent public schools. At the age of thirteen years, he became a clerical assistant in the drug store of E. H. Briggs, with whom he remained about three years, after which he continued his services in the same store, after the organization of the firm of Briggs & Larsh, until 1895, when he engaged in the same line of business in an individual way, his drug store being now one of the best in the village, both in appointments and facilities, as well as in all departments of its service. He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity Remington Lodge No. 351 and the Knights of Pythias Castle Hall No. 58 and both he and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian Church. On the 10th of October, 1895, Mr. Peck married Miss May Tedford, and they have one son, Bruce.

ISAAC L. PECK was born at Remington, Indiana, on the 13th of February, 1876, and after availing himself duly of the advantages of the public school he was for a time employed in a clerical capacity. For the past several years he has conducted a successful business as a contractor in the construction of stone roads, and after the death of his brother, William E., in 1915, he went to Chautauqua County, New York, to assist in the supervision and administration of the latter's estate. He is the only one of the children of the late Daniel W. Peck who is not married.

JAMES I. PECK, who is associated with his brother, Frank L., in the drug business at Remington, was born in this village on the 1st of September, 1877, and as a youth he followed various occupations, including service as a carrier on one of the rural mail routes emanating from Remington. He has been associated with his brother in the drug store since 1903, and like his brothers is a republican and identifed with the Masonic fraternity Remington Lodge No. 351 and the Knights of Pythias, Castle Hall No. 58. On the 20th of February,1908, was solemnized his marriage to Miss Katherine Meehan.

MARY E. PECK, only daughter, was born and reared at Remington, and her was solemnized her marriage to Max T. Price. They now reside at Charleston, Virginia, and have one son, Charles H.

MAURICE B. PECK, the youngest of the children, has been a resident of Remington from the time of his birth, which here occurred on the 17th of February, 1884--about one year and nine months prior to the death of his father. From his youth he has been associated with the mercantile business conducted by his eldest brother. On the 20th of February, 1907, he wedded Miss June Bowman, and they have one daughter, Maxine. He has followed the family rule in his political and fraternal associations, and thus is a republican, a Mason and a member of the Knights of Pythias.

The Peck family as a whole is one of prominence in the representative social activities of Remington and its various members in Jasper County have fully merited the unalloyed popular esteem accorded them.

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WARREN T. McCRAY Widely known as he is, as the "Herford Cattle King", Warren T. McCray, one of Newton County's most prominent men, is almost as well known in other connections of great importance all over the State of Indiana.

Warren T. McCray wa born on the old family homestead in Newton County, Indiana, February 4, 1865, being the second child and only son of Greenberry Ward and Martha J. (Galey) McCray. On June 15, 1892, Mr. McCray was united in marriage withElla M. Ade, the youngest child of John and Adaline (Bush) Ade and a sister of George Ade, distinguished author and playwright. To them were born four children: Lucile Ade, born October 30, 1893; Gilbert, born October 14 1896, deceased in infancy; Marian, born April 23 1900; and George Warren, born September 7, 1902. Mr. McCray and family are active members of the Presbyterian Church.

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GREENBERRY WARD McCRAY The second son of William and Lucinda (Edwards) McCray, was born on a farm near connersville, Indiana, July 13, 1839. At an early age he moved with his parents to a farm near Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana. Here he grew to manhood surrounded by the influences that accompanied the struggling pioneer life of early Indiana. He had the advantages of such public schools as existed at that time, and after teaching one winter he spent one year in the preparatory school for Wabash College.

On March 6,1862, he was joined in marriage to Martha Jane Galey, daughter of Samuel Smith and Elizabeth Galey, who lived on an adjoining farm to the McCray homested, thus culminating a romance in the lives of these neighboring children whose early affections ripened into love and marriage. Within a few days after the wedding ceremony, they atarted in a covered wagon across the trackless prairie to the new home in Newton County, which he had previously bought and prepared for his future residence. They located on the newly acquired farm, situated about 2 miles from the present town of Brook. At that time the Pan-Handle Railroad wa just being built from Lognsport to Peoria, through Goodland and Kentland, this placing within twelve to fourteen miles of railroad facilities.

The continued to live on this farm until October, 1870, when they moved to Kentland, the county seat. During this time they were blessed with three children, Fannie, the eldest, who married Frank A. Comparet, a prominent lawyer of the Newton County bar; Warren T., a sketch of whose life appears elsewhere, and Annie E., all of whom now live in Kentland.

An overwhelming sorrow came to him in the evening of his life, when his devoted companion passed away on December 12, 1912. He never overcame this great blow, and surviving her death only by one year and one day, he passed over to the Great Beyong. His life's work was complete.

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CHARLES T. DENHAM was born in Mount Pleasant, Ohio, now a part of the City of Cincinnati, Februay 14, 1852. His parents were Josiah W. and Isabelle (Scott) Denham. His grandfather, Joseph W. Denham, was an Englishman, entered the ministry in early life, and emigrated to America when his son Josiah was twelve yers of age. About 1832 he located in Cincinnati, and lived in that city or in the vicinity until his death at the age of eighty-eight. Josiah W. Denham, though quite well adbanced in years at the time, made a record as a soldier in the Civil war which will always be cherished by his descendants. He became a lieutenant in Company G of the 70th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, but finally was disabled and resigned his commission in 1863. In the fall of 1864 he moved his family to Starke County, Indiana, near Knox, and died there September 5, 1865. He is buried in the Round Lake Cemetery near Knox. He was twice married and had eight children: George H. has for many years been a successful educator and is now principal of the Hyde Park School in Cincinnati; he married Melissa Steel, now deceased, and by that marriage had Bertha, deceased; Grace Betts, who is now living at Middletown, Ohio; and Robert, also deceased.

Professor Denham married for his second wife, Carrie Wyatt, and their two children are Thomas W. and Martha. Of the other children of Josiah W. Denham, Robert M. and Ann E. are both deceased, the fourth in age is Charles T., Joseph E. is a Baptist minister now located at Pleasanton, Kansas, and Josiah W.Jr., is deceased. The father's second wife was Phoebe Broom, and the two children of their union were: Hattie E., who is the wife of Ford Warner, and they live with their family of children at Dallas, Texas; and Clara, now deceased.

After the death of his father, Charles T. Denham, in the spring of 1866 removed from Starke County, Indiana, to Grant Township in Newton County near Goodland, where he lived in the home of his step-uncle Eleazar Gorsline for two or three years. After that for several years he was employed as a farm hand by the residents of that locality and then engaged in farming for himslf. On September 3, 1874, he married Margaret A. Thompson, daughter of George G. and Elizabeth D. (Beal) Thompson. The Thompson family were among the very early settlers of Carpenter Township.

To Mr. and Mrs. Denham were born four children, two of whom died in infancy. Ina May married Blanchard Elmore and is now deceased. George H. is still living at home with his father. Mr. Denham is republican, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Church, in which he has been treasurer and trestee four or five years. He is associated with the Odd Fellows and is a member of Knights of Pythias at Remington. He is affiliated with the Masonic Lodge and the Sons of Veterans.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties
The Lewis Publishing Company - Chicago and New York - 1916

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For any further information on these families, please contact me.

Carol J. Wood
Harvey W. Wood

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